The Albert B. Sabin Archives

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A Biography of Dr. Sabin A Biography of Dr. Sabin

Albert B. Sabin, MD

Dr. Sabin and Child in Pavia, Italy, 1967.
Dr. Sabin and Child in Pavia, Italy, 1967.

We have a common interest in the elimination of disease that is a cause of human misery everywhere in the world. This common interest unites us in a desire for cooperation regardless of what else may separate us.

— Dr. Sabin, in his acceptance speech for the Rotary Award for World Understanding in 1985.

Best known as the developer of the oral, live virus polio vaccine, Dr. Albert Bruce Sabin influenced many aspects of vaccine development and virology throughout his career. Born in 1906 in Bialystok, Russia, Albert Sabin and his family came to the United States in 1921 to escape Jewish persecution. He would have become a dentist if his uncle had his way, but when Dr. Sabin read The Microbe Hunters by Paul de Kruif, he knew he wanted to pursue a career in biomedical research.

I was then given an after-school job at Harlem Hospital for which I received room and board at the hospital. Pneumonia was the big killer in 1927, and the only treatment was type-specific antipneumococcus serum. My job at the hospital was to inject mice with the sputum of the many patients who were admitted each day, and the following evening to determine the type of infecting pneumococcus. By that time, however, many of the patients were already dead. This was my first challenge as a ‘microbe hunter.’ — Dr. Sabin, in an essay ca. 1992

After receiving his medical degree from New York University in 1931, he worked in several research laboratories, including the Department of Bacteriology at New York University and the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research, where his inter­est in poliomyelitis began.

The 1970 National Medal of Science presented to Dr. Sabin on May 21,1971 by the President of the United States, Richard M. Nixon. Image Courtesy of the Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum.
The 1970 National Medal of Science presented to Dr. Sabin on May 21,1971 by the President of the United States, Richard M. Nixon

…for numerous funda­mental contributions to the understanding of viruses and viral diseases, culminating in the development of the vaccine which has eliminated poliomyelitis as a major threat to human health.

Image Courtesy of the Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum

In 1939, he came to the University of Cincinnati and the Children's Hospital Research Foundation, where he continued his passionate research in polio. However, Dr. Sabin took a brief break from polio during World War II to study Japanese B Encephalitis, sandfly and dengue fever while serving his country in the U.S. Army Medical Corps. Dr. Sabin also conducted research on toxoplas­mosis, arthritis, and cancer during his 30 years in Cincinnati.

Years of research led to the development and production of the oral poliovirus vaccine, which was approved for use in the United States in 1960. By using Sabin's atten­uated polio vaccine, as well as the inactivated poliovirus vaccine developed by Dr. Jonas Salk, polio was effectively eradi­cated in the United States in 1979.

Dr. Sabin believed that his vaccine could eliminate polio around the world due to its low cost and ease of ad­ministration. For the rest of his career, he spent much time advocating for National Immunization Days to distribute the oral vaccine.

In an unprecedented humanitarian gesture, he donated the strains of the polio virus to World Health Organiza­tion to increase their availability to developing countries.

After leaving the University of Cincinnati, Dr. Sabin was the President of the Weizmann Institute of Science, a professor at the Medical University of South Carolina, and a consultant with National Cancer Institute and Fogarty International Center for the Advanced Studies in the Health Sciences at the National Institutes of Health. Throughout these transitions, Dr. Sabin continued to be a proponent for polio eradication initiatives and the use of the oral polio vaccine.

Dr. Sabin retired from full-time work in 1986, but contin­ued to correspond with scientists about research until his death in 1993.

Watch a video clip from the full University of Cincinnati Oral Series interview of Dr. Sabin with Dr. Benjamin Felson and Dr. Saul Benison, March 8, 1979. The full interview video is available for viewing in the Sabin Archives Digital Collection.

As a humanitarian I'm deeply concerned. If we once grant that we do not live for ourselves alone and that perhaps the greatest joy that can come in the life of a human being comes from achievements that are related to doing something for others, then the concern for problems facing mankind in general in this world is perhaps of the utmost importance.

— Dr. Sabin, in The Scientific Life by Theodore Berland

Learn More

The entire collection (of which 50,000 pages have been digitized) is available for further research at the Henry R. Winkler Center. For more information, please contact us by email at chhp@uc.edu or phone at (513) 558-5120. To discover the full range of material available in the archives collection, please go to the OhioLINK Finding Aid Repository.

UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI LIBRARIES BLOG The Albert B. Sabin Digitization Project:  The Microbe Hunter

The first assignment I handled when I started at the Sabin Archive nearly a month ago was to inventory a recent acquisition. Mrs. Sabin and her son sent us another large shipment of documents, photographs, awards, videos, and almost everything else imaginable. Sifting through these items served as my introduction to Albert B. Sabin's life and legacy. This donation offered insight mainly into his later years and his posthumous honors with nearly all the items dating from 1970 forward. I learned many interesting things as I sorted through hundreds of fascinating items and I will share some of the most memorable items on this blog. First, I want to highlight an essay Dr. Sabin wrote in 1992 as an introduction to Paul de Kruif's “Microbe Hunters” which influenced his life greatly.

Written ca. 1992, Dr. Sabin's essay offers an autobiographical glimpse into his formative years. He mentioned many times that “Microbe Hunters” affected his career path. This essay describes its influence and, of even greater interest, his first forays into scientific experimentation.
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UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI LIBRARIES BLOG The Albert B. Sabin Digitization Project:  Dr. Sabin's Military Service

The Hauck Center for the Albert B. Sabin Archives contains 14.5 linear feet (29 boxes) dedicated to Dr. Sabin's work as a civilian consultant with the Armed Forces Epidemiological Board from 1941 to 1943 and again from 1946 to 1969.

From 1943 to 45, Dr. Sabin served on active duty with the Medical Corps, first as a Major and later as Lieutenant Colonel. He researched such diseases as dengue, sandfly fever, Japanese B and St. Louis encephalitis, and other neurotropic viral infections as part of the military's effort to reduce non combat-injury related illnesses and deaths. He helped to develop the St. Louis and Japanese B encephalitis and dengue vaccines. His service, both as a civilian and while on active duty, took him to many places across the world and allowed him to interact with many great scientific minds.
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UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI LIBRARIES BLOG The Albert B. Sabin Digitization Project:  Example of Compassion and How It Influenced a Life

Successful people are often described as being driven, strong-willed, or zealous. Though to be definitively admirable, a person should also be compassionate, forgiving, and considerate. Dr. Albert Sabin managed to find a steady balance between these two domains, stern yet soft. In speaking with Dr. Kenneth Blackman, a former assistant to Dr. Sabin, we gain some insight on the level of professionalism and empathy shown by Dr. Sabin.

As the story goes, Dr. Blackman, then a young man with an opportunity to work in Dr. Sabin's lab, was busy working on a project related to a potential human tumor virus. Dr. Blackman's duties were to properly identify and collect concentrates in fluid from tissue culture infected with this particular virus. Despite the relatively cramped working space (Old Children's Research Building R), Dr. Blackman was able to complete this rather standard collection with nary an incident for weeks. On a particular day though, a Friday, things took a heartbreaking turn for the worse. Dr. Blackman, completing the daily collection of concentrates from tissue culture, was steadily handling a bottle containing a few weeks' worth of sample liquid. Bottle in hand, as he was turning towards away from the tissue culture station, the bottom of the bottle clipped the edge of the work bench causing the contents to fall out.
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UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI LIBRARIES BLOG The Albert B. Sabin Digitization Project:  Essays on Sabin

We are currently in the process of redesigning the current Sabin website, which is very exciting! For this new website, I have been doing some research to create new content and update content already there. Through my search, I came across some essays about Dr. Sabin written by Dr. Allen B. Weisse, a cardiologist and medical historian.

In 1987, Dr. Weisse contacted Dr. Sabin about one of the essays that appeared in a book called Medical Odysseys: The Different and Sometimes Unexpected Pathways to Twentieth-Century Medical Discoveries. (The Sabin Archives has a folder of correspondence between Dr. Sabin and Dr. Weisse that discusses this chapter.[1]) They met later in 1987, when Dr. Weisse conducted an interview for this chapter.

This interview, along with several others, led Dr. Weisse to tackle the poliomyelitis discussion in his chapter “Polio: The Not-So-Twentieth-Century Disease.” This chapter both Dr. Sabin's and Dr. Jonas Salk's accomplishments and gave some background into poliomyleitis. Early in the chapter, Weisse wrote, “Although a brief summary such as this must, of necessity, omit mention of a number of individuals whose contributions were of great value, no reference to polio could possibly be made without the inclusion of Dr. Albert B. Sabin's remarkable accomplishments.”
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A Biography of Dr. Sabin A Biography of Dr. Sabin

Sabin Sundays and
His Oral Polio Vaccine

Families lined up to receive Dr. Sabin's oral polio vaccine at Cincinnati Children's Hospital on “Sabin Sunday”, April 24, 1960.
Image Courtesy of Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center.

To me, the most important as­pect of this is to indicate what can be done in an American city un­der a voluntary system of participation in an attempt to get rid of poliomyelitis…

— Dr. Sabin, in a letter to Dr. Tom Rivers, April
25, 1960

On Sunday, April 24, 1960, more than 20,000 children in Cincinnati, Ohio, and the surrounding area received the Sabin oral, live-virus polio vaccine in its first public distribution in the United States. Within two weeks, over 180,000 of the region's children ages 3 months to 6 years received the vaccine. Later known as "Sabin Oral Sunday," national campaigns throughout the United States and in many countries around the world, encouraged people to line to receive the oral vaccine in a few drops of syrup or on a sugar cube.

My internship at Bellevue Hospital did not begin until January, 1932qaand I continued to work in the laboratories of the Department of Bacteriology. At the Medical School on experimental pneumoccus infection in mice and rabbits in an attempt to gain more knowledge about the mechanism of death in the absence of bacteria. But, the biggest polio epidemic since 1916 broke out in July in New York City paralyzing more than 6,000 children, and killing many of them. My mentor, Dr. William H. Park, induced me to switch from pneumonia to polio. — Dr. Sabin, in an essay ca. 1992

Today this oral vaccine has helped to virtually eradicate polio from the globe. Dr. Sabin's interest in polio began early in his career. While at UC, Dr. Sabin and his colleagues had several breakthroughs that paved the way for the polio vaccine.

Dr. Sabin administers his oral poliovirus vaccine to two children in Cincinnati, 1960. This 1963 poster featured CDC's national symbol of public health, the “Wellbee”, who was depicted here encouraging the public to receive an oral polio vaccine. CDC used the Wellbee in its comprehensive marketing campaign that used newspapers, posters, leaflets, radio and television, as well as personal appearances at public health events. Wellbee's first assignment was to sponsor Sabin Type­II oral polio vaccine campaigns across the United States. Later, Wellbee's character was incorporated into other health promotion campaigns including diphtheria and tetanus immunizations, hand-washing, physical fitness, and injury prevention. This artifact can be found in the Global Health Odyssey, which is the CDC's museum featuring many various public health-related artifacts. This media comes from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Public Health Image Library (PHIL), with identification number #7224

(left) Dr. Sabin administers his oral polio vaccine in sweet cherry syrup. (right) This 1963 poster featured CDC's national symbol of public health, the “Wellbee”, encouraging the public to receive an oral polio vaccine. (This media comes from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Public Health Image Library (PHIL), with identification number #7224)

One major breakthrough for Dr. Sabin and his colleague Dr. Robert Ward was the discovery that the virus entered through the digestive system rather than the respiratory tract. This knowledge led Sabin to pursue an oral vaccine. While a faculty member at the University of Cincinnati's College of Medicine and the Children's Hospital Research Foundation, Dr. Sabin developed the vaccine that was later known as the “Sabin oral vaccine.”

The Sabin vaccine, which consists of three types of “attenuated” or weakened polioviruses, is taken by mouth and provides immunity to not only those who are vaccinated but also those who come in contact with the vaccinated. It requires no periodic booster and produces lifelong immunity.

Dr. Sabin began testing on humans in 1954 with volunteers at a correctional facility in Chillicothe, Ohio, with success, but not before giving the vaccine to his own family.

In 1956, after months of study and consultation about polio and both vaccines, the medical establishment in the Soviet Union decided to use Sabin's oral vaccine in a mass immunization program. Other countries, such as Mexico and Czechoslovakia, also participated in large field trials.

In the United States, children participating in the first “Sabin Sunday” in Cincinnati and Hamilton County led to the declaration that the area was the first “polio­free” area in the United States. The success of Dr. Sabin's studies, vaccine trials and programs eventually assisted efforts in the US to switch from an inactivated vaccine to a live, attenuated one. Subsequently, it became the vaccine of choice for many countries and has helped to effectively wiped out polio's existence.

Two of the 100,000 letters sent to Dr. Sabin during a hospital stay in 1983.
Two of the 100,000 letters sent to Dr. Sabin during a hospital stay in 1983.

To read those letters, I can't even tell you the feeling it gives me. It makes me feel that what I did was somehow worthwhile. You always have a feeling of doubting whether what you have done with your life is truly worthwhile. …People forget. But these letters …as long as I live, these letters will give me a feeling of warmth.

— Dr. Sabin to Bob Greene

In my estimation no man has ever contributed so much effective information – so continuously over so many years – to so many aspects of poliomyelitis, as Sabin.

— John R. Paul, MD, renowned epidemiologist, A History of Poliomyelitis

Learn More

The entire collection (of which 50,000 pages have been digitized) is available for further research at the Henry R. Winkler Center. For more information, please contact us by email at chhp@uc.edu or phone at (513) 558-5120. To discover the full range of material available in the archives collection, please go to the OhioLINK Finding Aid Repository.

UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI LIBRARIES BLOG The Albert B. Sabin Digitization Project:  Helping the Children

Dr. Sabin's oral polio vaccine has helped millions of children since its first public distribution many years ago. Besides the numerous awards and accolades that Dr. Sabin received for his work, he traveled around the world and advised others on how to implement a vaccination program. Along the way, Dr. Sabin was greeted by crowds, including many children, who expressed their appreciation for his work. The photos seen here are only a couple of the photos we have in our collection from his visits around the world.

My personal favorite is seen here, where Dr. Sabin is hugging a young boy in Pavia, Italy. Dr. Sabin was in Italy to receive the Minerva Award, which is “given annually to the highest personality in the domain of science, culture, and art.” My favorite part of the photograph is Dr. Sabin's smile because he looks happy and relaxed, unlike some of his more serious and studious photos that we have in our collection.
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UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI LIBRARIES BLOG The Albert B. Sabin Digitization Project:  October 24, World Polio Day

October 24 is known as “World Polio Day,” in honor of Dr. Jonas Salk's birthday. According to the Global Polio Eradication Initiative, since World Polio Day 2011, the number of new cases of polio has declined by a significant amount. Along with the success of a decrease in polio cases, the Global Polio Eradication Initiative has noted, “Polio eradication partners around the world are marking the first World Polio Day since India was removed from the list of countries with active transmission of wild poliovirus.” Currently, only three countries – Afghanistan, Nigeria and Pakistan – are considered endemic for polio.

I previously discussed the role of the oral polio vaccine and its role in helping to virtually eliminate polio around the world in last year's blog called, “The Albert B. Sabin Digitization Project: World Polio Day.” Today, in honor of World Polio Day, I just wanted to touch on the speech that Dr. Sabin gave when he received the Rotary Award for World Understanding in 1985. In his speech, he discussed “peace” and “trust.” He said, “Peace is easy among friends – but how does one achieve friendship between enemies, and if not friendship, at least trust?”
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UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI LIBRARIES BLOG The Albert B. Sabin Digitization Project:  Reaction to the Salk Polio Vaccine Clinical Trials

The clinical trials for Dr. Jonas Salk's polio vaccine began on February 23rd, 1954. This initial mass inoculation was huge in scale, “the clinical trials of the Salk vaccine were the largest ever conducted, involving nearly two million children”. Immediately the vaccine was announced and hailed as an enormous victory in the medical field against a disease plaguing countries around the world. In Dr. Salk's obituary the aforementioned announcement was referred to as “the turning point in the battle against polio” and it was said that, “news caused a public sensation probably unequaled by any health development in modern times”.[1]

One of Dr. Sabin's issues with the mass trials of Salk's newly developed vaccine seems to have been an issue with the media sensationalism of the proclaimed cure for polio. While Dr. Sabin was developing his oral polio vaccine, Dr. Walter K. Frankel wrote to him asking his advice on poliomyelitis, and amongst other things, questioning the sponsorship of the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis for Salk's vaccine. Dr. Sabin responded, “While I also deplore the propaganda which these days seems to be associated with anything having to do with poliomyelitis, I do not question the sincerity or the motives of the people working for the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis.”[2] Clearly, Dr. Sabin had an issue with the media portrayal of poliomyelitis at the time.
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The Archives The Archives

The Archives

Dr. Sabin working in his laboratory.

…I can only say that I wish you would do what I preach and not what I practice myself. If you don't write up the work you do over the years, it is work done for your own personal benefit and does not add to the sum total of scientific knowledge.

— Dr. Sabin, in a letter to Dr. Feldman, March 22, 1951

The Entire Collection

The Sabin archives occupy nearly 400 linear feet and consist of correspondence, laboratory notebooks, manuscripts, and other research papers generated by Dr. Sabin during his long and active medical career from 1930–1993. This extensive collection also contains his honors and awards, hundreds of photographs, video and audio tapes, as well as research materials such as microscope slides.

  • Highlights of the Entire Collection include—
  • His poliomyelitis research
  • His development of the live, oral poliovirus vaccine
  • His military career
  • Handwritten laboratory notebooks from 1947 to 1969
  • Manuscripts of lectures and publications
  • His research on other diseases
  • His non-scientific activities and views

The entire collection (of which 50,000 pages have been digitized) is available for further research at the Henry R. Winkler Center. For more information, please contact us by email at chhp@uc.edu or phone at (513) 558-5120. To discover the full range of material available in the archives collection, please go to the OhioLINK Finding Aid Repository.

Photo montage of Dr. Sabin and Dr. Saul Benison. Sabin photo from the UC Sabin Archives and Benison photo courtesy of University of Cincinnati Archives and Rare Books Library

Saul Benison's interviews with Albert Sabin provide important and under-utilized insights into the work of one of U.C.'s most famous faculty members and one of the most significant medical discoveries of the modern age. Read the full transcripts in the Digital Collection.

The Digital Collection

In 2010, the Winkler Center received a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to digitize correspondence and photographs in the collection. This “We the People” project is an initiative to encourage and strengthen the teaching, study, and understanding of American history and culture through the support of projects that explore significant events and themes in our nation's history and culture and that advance knowledge of the principles that define America.

In hopes of best reflecting Dr. Albert B. Sabin's research, life and interests, the material selected for the digitization project contain correspondence, photographs and other documents that highlight Dr. Sabin's medical research and interactions with contemporaries. Other parts of the collection have also been sampled to give researchers some idea of the enormous amount of material available in the entire archives.

Using this interactive map, locate and explore Dr. Sabin's correspondence by country, emphasizing his beliefs in mutual trust and international cooperation which led to the virtual eradication of polio around the world.

A scientist who is also a human being cannot rest while knowledge which might be used to reduce suffering rests on the shelf.

—Dr. Sabin

Learn More

The entire collection (of which 50,000 pages have been digitized) is available for further research at the Henry R. Winkler Center. For more information, please contact us by email at chhp@uc.edu or phone at (513) 558-5120. To discover the full range of material available in the archives collection, please go to the OhioLINK Finding Aid Repository.

UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI LIBRARIES BLOG The Albert B. Sabin Digitization Project:  Interview with Konstantin Chumakov

Recently, I wrote a blog post about an article that appeared in a recent issue of Scientific American about Drs. Sabin and Chumakov and their cooperation when testing the oral polio vaccine during the Cold War. Through the author of the article Mr. William Swanson, I was connected with Dr. Konstantin Chumakov, son of Dr. Mikhail P. Chumakov. Yesterday, I had the chance to speak with him about his father and Dr. Sabin. I wanted to share a bit about our conversation, as well as some materials in our collection.

For those of you that don't know, Dr. Sabin kept everything. So it was not a surprise to me that we have a folder in the “Correspondence” series of the Sabin collection that contains letters to and from Dr. Konstantin Chumakov. Most of these letters are about an article that Dr. Chumakov and his colleagues wrote for the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), which Dr. Sabin sponsored. However, there is a photograph (seen to the left) which is labeled “Moscow, 1961.” According to the photograph, “Kostya” (Dr. Konstantin Chumakov) is the first child from the left, standing in front of his father.

According to a letter written by Dr. Sabin, he had known Konstantin since he was four years old. He wrote, “I had an opportunity to see [Konstantin] grow and develop into the excellent molecular biologist that he has become. […] He has become an important member of a research team working on molecular biology problems of the oral polio vaccine that bears my name and on other problems.“[1]
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UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI LIBRARIES BLOG The Albert B. Sabin Digitization Project:  A Polio Research Collaboration

Recently, I was reading a chapter on the history of polio research by Saul Benison, a former professor of history at the University of Cincinnati. Prior to coming to Cincinnati, Dr. Benison held a notable position as the historian for the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis (see a previous blog about this organization). During this time, he wrote a memoir of virologist Thomas Rivers, which received much acclaim when it was published in 1967. While at Cincinnati, Dr. Benison worked extensively on a biography – really an oral history – about Dr. Sabin, but this book was never published.

Dr. Benison's chapter on polio research began in 1907 with Dr. Simon Flexner and discussed over 50 years of poliomyelitis research. Of course, no history of this disease can be covered without discussing Dr. Sabin. In one part of the chapter, Benison recalled a 1956 conference sponsored by the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis, which gathered scientists together to help Dr. Sabin in "choosing stable nonpathogenic virus strains" for the oral polio vaccine (p. 331-32). Dr. Benison wrote that the information that Dr. Sabin received from this conference allowed him to "successfully [adapt] Dr. Renato Dulbecco's plaquing techniques for the selection of attenuated virus strains suitable" for the vaccine (p. 332).
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UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI LIBRARIES BLOG The Albert B. Sabin Digitization Project:  The Sabin-Feldman Dye Test

Recently, I have been working with letters in the Sabin collection about toxoplasmosis, a disease that Dr. Sabin and several of his colleagues researched for quite some time. Some of this correspondence contains health information, so I have been reading letters quite closely to make sure we protect the privacy of those mentioned.

Here is some background information: Toxoplasmosis is a disease caused by the parasite Toxoplasma gondii and generally has few symptoms for those with healthy immune systems. However, those who are pregnant or have compromised immune systems are at risk for serious health problems if they are infected with Toxoplasma.[1] Many of the letters in the collection discuss congenital toxoplasmosis, which is when an unborn baby is infected with the parasite during the pregnancy, including labor and delivery. This infection can cause premature birth, as well as hearing loss, low birth weight, vision problems, seizures, and mental retardation. As you can imagine, mothers whose children were born with these types of symptoms were concerned for the health of the child, as well as concerned for their future children.

In 1948, Dr. Sabin and his colleague Dr. Harry A. Feldman published a brief paper in Science describing a Toxoplasma dye test, which often referred to as the Sabin-Feldman dye test (see note at end of blog for the citation). Today, this test is still recommended for use over other diagnostic methods.[2] Since I have recently examined correspondence about the disease and the dye test, I thought I would share some of the correspondence in our collection.
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About the Project The Archives

About the Project

In 2010, the University of Cincinnati Libraries received a $314,258 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) to digitize the correspondence and photographs of Dr. Albert B. Sabin. This digitization project has been designated a NEH “We the People” project, an initiative to encourage and strengthen the teaching, study, and understanding of American history and culture through the support of projects that explore significant events and themes in our nation's history and culture and that advance knowledge of the principles that define America. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this website do not necessarily reflect those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

The Hauck Center for the Albert B. Sabin Archives, founded with a generous grant from the John Hauck Foundation in 1995, is one of the Winkler Center's most significant collections, contributing to many publications and television productions about Dr. Sabin and the history of polio.

Dr. Sabin, developer of the oral polio vaccine, donated his complete correspondence, laboratory materials, manuscripts, awards and medals to the Henry R. Winkler Center for the History of Health Professions. His papers document both the development and testing of the oral polio vaccine and the growth of virology as a discipline. The creation of the Hauck Center has enabled the inventory and preservation of this irreplaceable collection of medical history for future study and research.

The entire collection (of which 50,000 pages have been digitized) is available for further research at the Henry R. Winkler Center. For more information, please contact us by email at chhp@uc.edu or phone at (513) 558-5120. To discover the full range of material available in the archives collection, please go to the OhioLINK Finding Aid Repository.

Attending the UC celebration (of the 50th anniversary of “Sabin Sunday”), Dr. Sabin's widow, Heloisa Sabin poses with an iron lung machine, a widely used treatment for severe cases of polio before her husband's live-virus vaccine helped to eradicate the crippling disease throughout most of the world. Photo by Dave Collins

  • Stephen MarineProject Director, University of Cincinnati Libraries
  • Doris HaagProject Co-Director, University of Cincinnati Libraries
  • Linda NewmanTechnology Leader, University of Cincinnati Libraries
  • Stephanie BrickingProject Archivist, University of Cincinnati Libraries
  • Carrie Hill-HarrissWebsite Design
  • Jeffrey O'FlynnLead Project Staff
  • Mary Kroeger VuykLead Project Staff
  • Ryan WashamProject Staff
  • Richard SookoorProject Staff
  • Megan RyanProject Staff
  • Kathlyn PintzProject Staff
  • Sydney HalpernUniversity of Illinois at Chicago
  • David MorensNational Institutes of Health
  • David OshinskyUniversity of Texas at Austin
  • Frank SnowdenYale University

Learn More about Dr. Sabin The Archives

Learn More

The entire collection (of which 50,000 pages have been digitized) is available for further research at the Henry R. Winkler Center. For more information, please contact us by email at chhp@uc.edu or phone at (513) 558-5120. To discover the full range of material available in the archives collection, please go to the OhioLINK Finding Aid Repository.

As part of our 2010 National Endowment for the Humanities grant, Sabin project staff have created lesson plans to encourage high school teachers to use the Sabin digital collection in their classrooms. Please feel free to use these materials in the classroom setting.

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